Tests and Procedures

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Find a test or procedure by its first letter

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N526 : Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (Mayo)

Comment

Test Code
N526
Test Name
Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (Mayo)
Department
Immunology
Sample Type/Volume
serum 2 ml
Storage Condition
Frozen : Stability 180 Days
Collection Remark
-
Principle
Spectrophotometry (SP)
Method
Spectrophotometry (SP)
Reference Range
> or =18 years: 16-85 U/L 0Y-17Y: ACE activity may be 20-50% higher in healthy children compared to healthy adults (16-85 U/L)
Clinical
Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) participates in the renin cascade in response to hypovolemia. Its peptidase action on the decapeptide angiotensinogen I results in the hydrolysis of a terminal histidyl leucine dipeptide and the formation of the octapeptide angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor that increases blood pressure. 

The primary source of ACE is the endothelium of the lung. ACE activity is increased in sarcoidosis, a systemic granulomatous disease that commonly affects the lungs. In sarcoidosis, ACE is thought to be produced by epithelioid cells and macrophages of the granuloma. 

Currently, it appears that ACE activity reflects the severity of sarcoidosis: 68% positivity in those with stage I sarcoidosis, 86% in stage II sarcoidosis, and 91% in stage III sarcoidosis. Serum ACE also appears to reflect the activity of the disease; there is a dramatic decrease in enzyme activity in some patients receiving prednisone.
 
Other conditions such as Gaucher disease, leprosy, untreated hyperthyroidism, psoriasis, premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome, adults with amyloidosis, and histoplasmosis have been associated with increased levels of ACE.
 
Turnaround Time
10 Days
Operation Schedule
N/A